Remember Me
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ISBN 9781561458448
Make Way For Books
Provides an unflinching exploration of Birmingham, Alabama in 1963, when a series of protests including the Children's March, changed a community and country. Told through the perspectives of four participants, the book relates history with an immediacy and authenticity rarely found in such nonfiction. NOTE: Since the book features eyewitness accounts and quotes from major players, racially insensitive language is used within appropriate historical contexts. Some young adults may need direction in understanding the usage of terms that are inappropriate in contemporary society.
Publisher Summary
We've Got a Job tells the little-known story of the 4,000 black elementary-, middle-, and high school students who voluntarily went to jail in Birmingham, Alabama, between May 2 and May 11, 1963. Fulfilling Mahatma Gandhi's and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.'s precept to "fill the jails," they succeeded:where adults had failed:in desegregating one of the most racially violent cities in America. Focusing on four of the original participants who have participated in extensive interviews, We've Got a Job recounts the astonishing events before, during, and after the Children's March.

Discusses the events of the four thousand African American students who marched to jail to secure their freedom in May 1963.
 
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